History

Since opening in 1923 as a residential hotel, the stately Alcazar (which means “home in a fortress”) has welcomed travelers, visitors and emigres of all walks of life from around the world. Today, a diverse mixture of daily bed-and-breakfast guests, furnished-apartment tenants and an active community of independent senior residents continue to benefit from this steadfast tradition of ethnic, cultural and generational variety and richness at The Alcazar.

The Alcazar, a five-story pentagon whose wings surround a lush botanical courtyard, was designed by Harry T. Jeffery, who teamed up with fellow Clevelanders Kent Smith and George Halse. It was modeled after the Alcazar and Ponce deLeon hotels in St. Augustine, Florida, as well as the similarly named Alcazar in Seville, Spain.

Situated just opposite the old Euclid Club House and triangled within what had been golf course holes one, two and nine, Cleveland’s Alcazar was “built for those who know how to live graciously and well”, according to The Cleveland Heights Dispatch. It quickly became
“the” place for the local elite to dine and dance, and with 140 one-to-four-room suites, emerged as one of the region’s most chic addresses for visiting dignitaries and celebrities. Entertainer Bob Hope kept a suite here, as did Olympic athlete and Hollywood actor Johnny Weissmuller and composer Cole Porter, who reportedly wrote his hit, “Night and Day”, while in residence at 2450 Derbyshire Road.

Designated a Cleveland Heights Landmark, listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and twice recognized by the Cleveland Chapter of The American Institute of Architects, The Alcazar is a majestic architectural gem whose eclectic Spanish-Moorish motif, comfortable appointments and eager, willing staff afford an oasis-like taste of old-world elegance, familial hospitality and soothing satisfaction seldom found today.

We are committed to the ongoing restoration of this historic dwelling, whose legacy of elegant living continues to welcome visitors from around the world.